In 2008, Mr. Willett became a partner in Beemer, Hadler & Willett, P.A. His primary practice areas are education law and real estate law, but he also provides legal representation to his clients in the areas of estate planning, business incorporation, contract review, entertainment law, and estate planning.

Mr. Willett practices education law in the primary, secondary, post-secondary, and private contexts. He provides representation on a wide variety school law subject areas including student discipline; special education (including matters involving Section 504 and IDEA disputes); employment law; student assignment; torts; negligence; open meeting and public records laws; public bidding laws; real property and construction law; copyright and intellectual property law; constitutional and statutory law; contract law; racial, disability and gender discrimination suits; school finance; athletics; public bidding laws; and merger.

Chris Willett was born in Lenexa, Kansas in 1973. He graduated Phi Beta Kappa from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1995 with a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science. He graduated from the University of North Carolina School of Law in 2000. Mr. Willett was admitted to the North Carolina Bar in 2000, and was admitted to the Middle District of North Carolina in 2006.

Mr. Willett’s law practice focuses upon education law in the primary, secondary, post-secondary, and private contexts. He previously represented the Chapel Hill-Carrboro City Schools and worked as Assistant University Counsel at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. His school clients have also included public and private schools, a professional association, a non-profit educational foundation, the North Carolina School Boards Trust, school administrators, professors, teachers, teacher assistants, parents, staff, and students. He has represented clients with respect to state and federal lawsuits, mediations, Equal Employment Opportunity Commission complaints, Office for Civil Rights complaints, internal and OAH administrative hearings, Board hearings, Individualized Education Plan meetings, grievances, and employee dismissals.

Mr. Willett taught Education Law as an Adjunct Professor at the University of North Carolina School of Law with Dean John C. Boger for three years. He has also provided regular school law presentations to Masters of Education students at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Board of Education members, special education staff, teacher assistants, administrative staff, and various school faculties.

Mr. Willett resides in Durham with his wife, son and daughter. In his free time, he enjoys watching live music, playing basketball, and following his beloved Tar Heels and Jayhawks.